How to close a board meeting?

The board members do not want the meeting to go on for too long, yet they may stray. The chair is responsible for assisting them in remaining focused on the order of business and completing their critical responsibilities.

As a Chairman, how do you end a board meeting?

This page describes why a meeting could be called to a conclusion, how to conclude the meeting, and the most common language used by chairmen to terminate the meeting. Continue reading to learn more about how to manage productive board meetings.

Who is in charge of calling the meeting to a close?

The chair is in charge of both opening and closing the board meeting. The chair’s responsibility is to oversee the whole event, from the welcome directors to the numerous agenda items to the adjournment.

The chair or another director may request that the meeting be adjourned early in specific circumstances. This might be because of an emergency, a disruptive member, a medical condition, or any other reason that makes it unwise to proceed. However, depending on your meeting regulations, this only works in specific instances.

If you’re utilizing Robert’s Rules of Order, for example, the chair or a director can move to adjourn the meeting, but only if there’s an immediate threat. When there is no imminent danger to life, the motion must be seconded, and the board must vote unanimously to adjourn without debate. Only if there is a life-threatening situation can the board chair make a unilateral decision.

Reasons for a Meeting’s Termination

There are two basic causes for the conclusion of a board meeting:

1. You’ve covered everything on the agenda

After the board has reviewed and voted on all planned issues, received financial reports and committee reports, and considered motions and recommendations, the meeting may be adjourned. At the end of the meeting, there is a chance for any further business, and once the chair has dealt with any feedback from this – either allowing a discussion or pledging to add it to the next meeting agenda – the board meeting can be adjourned.

2. You’ve reached the end of your time limit

Board members have busy lives, typically with a second full-time job and other board commitments, so they value their time. When you set a time limit for a board meeting, it’s only fair to keep to it. It not only shows respect for the board’s time, but it also stops the meeting from dragging on too long and the board from becoming disengaged from the issues at hand.

These two reasons for quitting a conference should, in theory, coincide. A successful chair will be able to create an agenda that meets the time constraints and will be able to guide the discussion to keep the momentum continuing so that it concludes on time.

3. A quorum cannot be established

When there is no quorum, you may be compelled to adjourn the meeting if it is required by national law or if it is part of the company’s articles of organization and bylaws. In the United Kingdom, for example, if the requisite quorum is not present, the meeting must be adjourned and rescheduled for another day.

Talk about the last item on the to-do list.

Inquire whether there is any further business.

Reasons, risks, and remedies for bad meetings

Meetings require a major commitment of time and money on the part of an organization. As a result, the costs of terrible meetings are enormous – both in terms of wasted time and the opportunity costs of squandering time that could have been utilized to produce value. Bad meetings lose an estimated €64.72 billion in Germany alone, and this amount is significantly greater in the United States, where sunk costs total about $400 billion.

Reasons for bad meetings, hazards, and solutions

So, why are so many businesses plagued by ineffective meetings? In this post, we’ll look at:

the causes of terrible meetings, the hazards involved with them, and how to prevent them altogether in order to guarantee that your organization avoids the destructive nature of bad meetings.

What is the definition of a terrible meeting?

Before we go any farther, we need to agree on what we mean when we say a meeting is “poor.” The term “poor meetings” has come to mean “ineffective meetings” or “unproductive meetings,” but the concepts are far wider, and we need a more inclusive definition.

A terrible meeting is one in which participants “meet too often,” “a few people [are permitted] to dominate talks,” and leaders fail “to establish an environment where attendees genuinely struggle with ideas and participate in critical thinking,” according to the Harvard Business Review.

Furthermore, a terrible meeting is one that has no goal. Nobody appreciates meetings for the sake of meetings, therefore a meeting with no clear goal is annoying for everyone involved.

Only 17 percent of executives said their meetings are typically beneficial uses of group and individual time, according to a Harvard Business School survey. A whopping 71 percent of respondents felt their meetings were ineffective and wasteful, while 62 percent said they squandered opportunities to bring the company closer together. Similarly, according to a recent McKinsey poll, 61% of CEOs think they waste the majority of their decision-making time.

Simply described, a terrible meeting is one that has no goal and does not allow members to successfully interact. A terrible meeting lacks a framework that encourages participation from those who are best suited to remark on the issues at hand, as well as a structure that keeps attendees focused on a common goal.

On the surface, this appears simple, and hence should be quite easy to avoid. So, what are the reasons why so many businesses continue to have awful meetings?

The causes of ineffective meetings

We’ve never been better prepared to run a successful meeting than we are now. So, why are so many meeting attendees convinced that they are a waste of time? People, procedure, and technology are three basic categories that may be used to categorize the reasons for terrible meetings.

Why should meetings be any different? Technology is revolutionizing our lives and companies, so why should meetings be any different? One of the most common ways that technology may lead to terrible meetings is by not realizing its full potential. Furthermore, having a jumble of technologies that don’t operate together fluidly might be overwhelming for meeting attendees, causing tension and dissatisfaction.

Now that we understand the reasons for terrible meetings, we can consider the dangers of permitting bad meetings to continue.

Meetings that aren’t productive come with a lot of hazards

Meetings that are well-managed provide enormous potential. The hazards connected with terrible meetings.

Financial Management for Nonprofits

The important areas of cash management and bookkeeping, which should be done according to particular financial controls to maintain integrity in the bookkeeping process, are where basic financial management abilities begin. To truly comprehend the financial health of the organization, new leaders and managers should learn how to prepare financial statements (from bookkeeping journals) and analyze such statements as quickly as possible.

Everything You Need to Know About Financial Management in Nonprofits

Financial analysis reveals the “truth” of a company’s position; as a result, financial management is one of the most significant management activities. This topic will assist you in understanding fundamental financial management techniques and developing the basic structures and processes required in a healthy organization.

The assets of a benevolent nonprofit must be utilized in conformity with contributors’ purpose and in support of the charity goal, according to the fiduciary obligation of the board of directors. Adopting financial policies by the board of directors is one technique to guarantee smart financial management. A conflict of interest policy is perhaps the most critical financial policy for any charitable organization.

Financial policies define the roles, duties, and authority for key financial management tasks and decisions. Staff and Board members are likely to function upon a set of assumptions that may or may not be accurate and productive in the absence of an accepted policy.

A policy that defines how cash is handled, whether and how a board member or employee’s travel expenses will be paid, and the board’s involvement in reviewing the executive director’s remuneration are all examples of financial rules often employed by charities. A finance policy that covers how the nonprofit’s funds are invested is another example. Do you have concerns about the financial practices of your nonprofit? Perhaps a money management check-up is in order! Self-assessments are tools that can assist you to concentrate the attention of the board of directors and/or prioritize next measures. The self-assessment tools listed below might assist you in focusing primarily on financial management techniques. How’s it going with your non-profit?

Financial management methods that provide stability and flexibility are used by healthy nonprofit organizations today and in the future. The 12 golden standards for nonprofit finance, including budgeting, diversified funding sources, and interdependence, are outlined in this document.

About Propel Nonprofits

Nonprofit organizations have a positive influence on communities and individuals through providing services, advocating for causes, and fostering community. Financial actions and decisions support powerful missions, creative initiatives, and dedicated personnel and volunteers behind the scenes. Financial management methods that promote stability and flexibility today and in the future are used by healthy nonprofit organizations.

Budgeting

Budgets are important because they give the financial data that underpins all planning. Budgets that work are realistic, based on reasonable assumptions and with clear responsibilities for meeting those expectations.

Program Costs

Good knowledge is essential while making financial decisions. In order to make judgments about fundraising requirements, contract conditions, and program extension or change, organizations must first grasp the true expenses of their operations.

Various Funding Options

Diversifying financing sources, while appealing, isn’t simple and isn’t always a good idea. Different sources of revenue necessitate various systems, institutions, connections, and communication channels.

Expenses for Functional/Infrastructure (aka, Core Mission Support)

Functional expenditures, such as program services and general/administration & fundraising (often referred to as “overhead”), must be accounted for by nonprofits. While donors may prefer lesser administrative costs, this focus is unstable and unsustainable.